Light Trespass Ordinance Update and Deadline

The deadline for comments in support of the revised Light Trespass Ordinance for San Bernardino County is Friday, June 18. Send them to: [email protected]

We have revised our recent News item on this subject with new video footage. The presentation video (one hour) now includes post-presentation interaction of our presenters with the Commissioners, and we now have the full video of the meeting including timestamps for public comment via video from the Joshua Tree Government Center and for an oppositional presentation by a Newberry Springs resident. All these links and information are here.

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  • Linda Kranz
    Hello. All I can say is that I grew up in the Inland Empire. Some streets had lights, & a few only had a couple. But I got to see stars nearly every night. I didn’t really appreciate as much until I was the kitchen manager at a Girl Scout Camp in Big Bear; I was head cook with one assistant. My 40 something year old assistant had been there 3 years. She told me that she’d never seen stars until she came to the camp. She lived in Los Angeles. I asked “really?” & she said really because if all the street lights. I now cherish that I grew up seeing stars, & currently see stars every night where I now live; a place with no “light pollution”.

    Please allow residents to cherish seeing the stars & not allow light to trespass on their piece of solitude.
  • Cher Schriefer
    I grew up in Fontana where when the Santa Ana’s blew the dark night sky was a mysterious cloak of stars and planets. I moved to Orange County where the dark night sky gradually gave way to Orion’s Belt and the planet Venus. At retirement, I found a home In Yucca Valley with an unobstructed eastern landscape of Joshua Tree’s dark night sky zone. It was only then, on a Moonless night that I sat outside in the glory of the Milky Way. While my view is protected, I worry that the generations to come will be robbed of this magnificent galactic perspective lost to many Southern Californians. This natural resource is as important to humanity as is air and water. It must be protected.
  • Laraine Turk